Developer driven BIM

What is the difference between design team driven BIM and developer driven BIM?

BIM has finally arrived to where it belongs, with the developers them self. We are looking at a brighter future in-terms of reducing risks, increased financial gain and improved abilities to manage the built assets. But only if we implement standards and processes (BIM) in the right places and to its full potential.

Looking back at the experience we have gained since BIM Level 2 became official back in 2016. We have collected a lot of best practices and we have developed technology and solutions. But we have also learned what not to do and where the weaknesses and issues are with BIM. Even though gaining this experience has been challenging and frustrating at times. We can now apply BIM more effectively within the developers organisations with a focus on the business objectives.

Quick re-cap on what is going on with BIM in the UK.

From April 2016 BIM Level 2 was made official and its adoption has been gradually growing by roughly 10% per year since. This growth is mainly within the design sector and we are now looking at an 80% UK market adoption. So, the design sector should be ready to hand over the BIM torch.

The drive behind BIM in the UK is a Government led ambition intended to help improving its construction interest. We have seen a growth in the popularity across the industry both nationally and internationally and the BIM concept is proven to be beneficial. As a result, and timely coordinated with the UK governments plans for the future of the UK construction industry. The ISO 19650 was published in December 2018. In short, this ISO is derived from the UK BIM Level 2 process and focus on the developer’s ownership of the Information and BIM management on the projects. Meaning that BIM should favour the developer’s business objectives. As such, the adoption of BIM from 2019 should be tailored to the developers business needs.

What is the issue with BIM?

Over the years, in my experience, most of the BIM projects (50+) I have supported have been design team led. Sure, the upswing of the Information Manager (IM) function has helped to shift focus slightly to the client needs, but not sufficiently. Meaning that the design teams have defined the scope for BIM and advised the clients on what should/will be delivered and how. In many cases this type of design team collaboration has also been driven by software preferences and often solely focused on 3D coordination. Even with the appointment of an IM, projects are still very much design focused. Why is this an issue? Because, the developers are by-passed in the time and cost management of the design stages that are defined by factors such as collaboration, technology, process and abilities. The output (the design) is derived from these factors. And if the production of the output does not meet the developer’s business objectives. The risk, cost and time will not only increase during the design stages but also for the entirety of the asset life span. As it is now, the developers pay for this as an additional cost that was never considered.

Moving forward

It is not a difficult answer to; what we should do about the risk, cost ad time issues?

Implement the control of the standards, processes, technology and ability in the developers organisations and drive the project from the top and in advance of RIBA PoW Stage 1.

DDC Solutions

At DDC Solutions we implement standards, processes and technology directly in to the business and enable the client to instruct, advice and support the design team down the chain.

To prepare for developer driven BIM projects we have also adapted the BIM implementation for the contractors to work directly from the client’s business objectives and drive the design stages from the top.

For the design teams we have a completely different implementation approach. We prepare the design practice to be compliant with the developers or contractors requests and needs. And to be fully functional as an ISO 19650 coordinated team that can deliver what, how and when is required.

Meaning that the Architects and Engineers can focus on being Architects and Engineers. Leaving the developers and contractors to focus on their functions.

 

 

Tag

#Developers #Contractors #construction #BIM #iso19650 #BIMLevel2 #process #standards #Assetdevelopers #constructiondevelopers #builders #buildingcontractor

Inspired to progress, in the best way possible. By driving the innovation of technology, process and service to unify an industry. To communicate and collaborate to be the best we can be.
DDC Solutions

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Twitter @AEC_People

Knowledge Retention

One significant issue any company owner is facing is the growth and retention of knowledge within the organisation. Growing and retaining knowledge is not an easy task. Mainly due to the fast pace of technology development, new standards and processes, decreasing fees and increasing salary expectations from specialist knowledge roles and functions.

For a director, the combination of limited time to learn about service solutions and strategize to make the right decisions on how to grow and learn about the new technologies, standards and processes. It is very easy to make decisions by “box-ticking” so to speak, when selecting a product or service.

Chances are that the products and services are not tailored to meet the goals in the organisation’s strategy. Or worse, the organisation does not have a strategy and have not considered that there are differences in quality between different service providers. i.e. the assumption is that “a training provider is a training provider”.

The first step any organisation needs to take, to ensure that knowledge is growing and retained adequately. Is to know what type of knowledge that is required and why.

Why is this important? I illustrate by using a common scenario.

If an organisation needs a project team to learn Revit. The “box-ticking” approach is often to buy a 1 -5-day training course on Revit at a premium price. Usually with the rationale that a well-known service provider that can charge premium rates and have the training course ready to go (off-the-shelf) would be a safe option. And. . .  “Revit is Revit”, so the team should learn to use Revit over 1-5 days.

Does this sound familiar?

Commonly what the organisations fail to recognize is that the knowledge is often not retained by the team members in these type of training sessions. An overload of information about the buttons and functions in the software often imprint a negative experience as there is no insight to practical application for all the functions covered.

After 1-5 days training the managerial expectations are that the team will be familiar with, and be able to use, the software. The team struggle to deliver as the “premium” training method was in-effective for the real world.

The project team have spent 1-5 days away from the project and in the end the organisation has lost both time, money and not gained any real knowledge in the organisation. Since the team struggle to deliver the Revit project to the organisation’s standard, resentment build between the organisation and the project team members and eventually the team members add the “Revit training” to the CV and look for a new job with a higher salary expectation.

It is worth pointing out here that the training providers usually deliver exactly what they advertised, so the fault does not rest with them. It is the customer who need to ensure they buy a service that meet their needs. Back to the original issue raised with directors’ available time etc.

To ensure that the service bought meet the knowledge development needs…… let’ s go back to The first step.

If time is limited within the organisation, to learn about services and technology, in order to make an educated decision on what training is required. You should contact a service provider who offer free consultation to understand the organisation’s needs.

If the service provider truly has your best interest at heart, they will help formulate a strategy demonstrating how learning outcome will be achieved and how this training will cater to your individual challenges. Ideally, knowledge retention should be included in the strategy.

Keep in mind that your team has role-based knowledge needs and those should be highlighted in the strategy. Be thorough in what you want and remember if you don’ t ask, you don’ t get. The service provider should also highlight how BIM Level 2 and ISO19650 requirements are met in relation to the training.

When you have received a proposal that meets the organisational needs Go over the proposal and the fee to make sure you are happy. In this way there will be no additional cost later.

Second Step. Follow the plan and take the advice from the service provider. Since the service provider have listened to, created a strategy that is specific to your needs and you have agreed to. It is safe to say that the service provider does have your best interest in mind.  So, commit to the growth and knowledge retention goals the organisation and the service provider have planned for.

That’s it, two simple steps that will help your organisation to grow and retain knowledge in this fast-paced technology jungle. Know what you need and stick to the plan. Sounds simple, right?

Finally, if you want to reduce the risk of losing time and money, be aware of the following.

Employing expensive “experts” does not guarantee results. By default, they must justify and protect their own interest over those of the organisation. They do this using a method called “Knowledge retention”. Knowledge retention creates a dependability on the individual and involves not being open and sharing details about the development, how to maintain and service the systems etc. If this individual leaves the organisation, usually due to lack of pay rise and higher salary offered elsewhere. The organisation loses the knowledge they have invested heavily in. Employing a new expert will usually not resolve the issue, it will repeat the cause of the issue.

You can avoid this by spreading the required knowledge across the organisation and by committing to a steady growth (i.e. the strategy). This will allow the organisation to grow as a whole and allow you to cope with minor inconveniences when staff decide to move on. The salaries don’t have to be inflated to compete for individuals with expert knowledge. Instead money can be invested where it can help the organisation grow in other areas.

 

 

Inspired to progress, in the best way possible. By driving the innovation of technology, process and service to unify an industry. To communicate and collaborate to be the best we can be.

DDC Solutions

BIM. A Worldwide Process

ISO19650 – Part 1 and Part 2: 2018 are out!

Let’s quickly recap on what we already know about Building Information Modelling -BIM- in UK.

The British standards BS 1192:2007+A2:2016 and PAS 1192‑2:2013 are aimed at clarifying standards for achieving a collaborative framework for BIM Level 2 in the UK. Despite the British governmental mandate for its adoption, several challenges have been underpinned in the latest studies. In fact, being developed from the BSI – national standards body of the UK- the usage of aforementioned standards has been limited to the British AEC Industry without its adoption worldwide.

We received good news a month ago when ISO19650 – Part 1 and Part 2: 2018- Organisation and digitisation of information about buildings and civil engineering works, including building information modelling (BIM): Information management using building information modelling – have been published as internationalisation of the UK’s BIM Level 2 standards.

We have been lucky from this side of the world, ISO is based on the British standards. Are you wondering why you should adopt International Standards at this point? Well. National standards are no longer in place, instead, a transition guide has been published in the UK whilst waiting for the National Annex to ISO to be published, later this year.

In the meantime, adjustments regarding current documentation and process are required, as further details about the information delivery and flow have been outlined. In fact, the aim of these ISO standards is to support all the involved parties to achieve their business objectives, with an appropriate framework related to management of information during operational and delivery phase of assets.

These ISO principles are applicable regardless of types and sizes of organisations and regardless of the chosen procurement strategy. Although each stakeholder shall collaborate for delivering sets of required information and developing adequate ISO compliant documents while following a defined flow of information, the appointing parties as Developers, shall evaluate the most effective management of information throughout the project and schedule the appropriate strategy for the long-term asset information management, establishing protocols and requirements for lead appointed party, as architects, and third-appointed parties.

This is what is going on with BIM and ISO. What about us?

DDC Solutions strongly believe that the development of this well-structured ISO19650 – Part 1 and Part 2: 2018 will enable an effective exchange of agreed information in the entire construction supply chain not solely in the UK, but worldwide. This newly defined and structured flow of information will highlight the beneficial application of BIM – Building Information Modelling – as collaborative process between different involved parties and especially to cost and time effective for the project delivery and further asset management.

We updated our resources and improved our knowledge. We keep choosing to be part of this global expansion process.

Are you?

For more information on how we can help follow the link and drop us a message: https://www.ddcsolutions.co.uk/aecp-about-us/

 

By Cristiano Barretta – Consultant, DDC Solutions

 

Tags

#ISO19650 #professionalism #BIM  #BIMLevel2 #process #standards #AECPeople

Inspired to progress, in the best way possible. By driving the innovation of technology, process and service to unify an industry. To communicate and collaborate to be the best we can be.
DDC Solutions

 

LinkedIn Jimi Clarke

Twitter @AEC_People

Validation

Validation

Is validating our work really that time consuming?

Validation
Validation Image

In my industry, and yours, validation of the work we do is critical to make sure that the products and services we provide are up to standard and fit for purpose. E.g. an MOT. But often, validation is over looked and seen as a process pushed by a “manager” to tick a process box. But on the other hand, we highly value the time we spend on procrastination validation. How much time do we spend on such activities and how does it compare to the validation that we should prioritise but happily neglect?

Why do we validate? Or rather, why do we happily validate when there are no set or agreed criteria to validate against and there are no real gains from the validation. But as soon as we have agreed criteria and there is something to be gained from the validation. Well, then we are most reluctant to waste the time on this extra work.

Example. Procrastination validation on social media posts and comments relating to food, selfies, cats and cucumbers etc. The average person in 2017 spent 116 min a day on social media (Reference 1) and, based on my own “validation” on that statistic, the average person did not make any great advances physically or spiritually as a result of the time spent.

Validation methodology. The methodology I used in validating the above statistic, was the old and tested technique we all use. I am of course talking about the “I bloody know what I am talking about”. We make quick judgments (Validations) about facts, fiction, people, cats, pasta and shelves. Based on our 30 second google research and our vast experiences on every subject known to man.

116 min a day!!

The time you have left in between social media, eating and sleeping we spend working. At work, validation is often critical to our results and for us to get paid. If we, at least that is what they tell us, validate our work against the standards and processes that industry experts have spend a significant amount of time developing, testing and training “you” on. We could help the company, help the clients, progress our career and become experts our self, as a result of knowing how to deliver great products and services.

What is the most used comment to the request to learn new validation standards and actually using them?

“it’s a lot of work and I don’t have time”.

 

Example. In my industry, validation is key. The average architect or engineer need to learn a handful of validation points to be used as they are working. They would need to run through the validation again before sending information out or using incoming information and they would need to do a more thorough validation every quarter or so per project. Total validation time spend. . . ball park. . . about 400min per month or to put it in a different way. 4 days of social media validation.

The average person spend about 3h per week on social media during work hours (Reference 2) or 30 min per day. That is 10 min more than the professional validation of one’s work require per day.

I’m just saying!

 

Tags

#validation #professionalism #BIM #bs1192 #BIMLevel2 #process #standards

Reference 1:
https://www.socialmediatoday.com/marketing/how-much-time-do-people-spend-social-media-infographic
Reference 2:
http://workplaceinsight.net/uk-workers-waste-over-two-hours-a-day-on-social-media-and-other-distractions/
Inspired to progress, in the best way possible. By driving the innovation of technology, process and service to unify an industry. To communicate and collaborate to be the best we can be.
DDC Solutions

LinkedIn Jimi Clarke

Twitter @AEC_People